Aristotle Sayings and Quotes

Below you will find our collection of inspirational, wise, and humorous old aristotle quotes, aristotle sayings, and aristotle proverbs, collected over the years from a variety of sources.


Emotions of any kind can be evoked by melody and rhythm; therefore music has the power to form character.      

Aristotle

Fear is pain arising from the anticipation of evil.     

Aristotle

Anything whose presence or absence makes no discernible difference is no essential part of the whole.     

Aristotle

What is a friend? A single soul dwelling in two bodies.     

Aristotle

Being a father is the most rewarding thing a man whose career has plateaued can do.     

Aristotle

The end of labor is to gain leisure.     

Aristotle

The weak are always anxious for justice and equality. The strong pay no heed to either.     

Aristotle

No excellent soul is exempt from a mixture of madness.     

Aristotle

The first principle of all action is leisure.     

Aristotle

It is during our darkest moments that ew must focus to see the light.     

Aristotle

Only the cunning needs excuses.     

Aristotle

These, then, are the four kinds of royalty. First the monarchy of the heroic ages; this was exercised over voluntary subjects, but limited to certain functions; the king was a general and a judge, and had the control of religion The second is that of the barbarians, which is a hereditary despotic government in accordance with law. A third is the power of the so-called Aesynmete or Dictator; this is an elective tyranny. The fourth is the Lacedaemonian, which is in fact a generalship, hereditary and perpetual.     

Aristotle

Magistrates rule by an established rotation; kings reign for life.     

Aristotle

Love is composed of a single soul inhabiting two bodies.     

Aristotle

All human actions have one or more of these seven causes: chance, nature, compulsions, habit, reason, passion, desire.     

Aristotle

The ultimate value of life depends upon awareness and the power of contemplation rather than upon mere survival.     

Aristotle

A body in motion can maintain this motion only if it remains in contact with a mover.     

Aristotle

Of the modes of persuasion furnished by the spoken word there are three kinds. The first kind depends on the personal character of the speaker; the second on putting the audience into a certain frame of mind; the third on the proof, provided by the words of the speech itself.     

Aristotle

The most perfect political community is one in which the middle class is in control, and outnumbers both of the other classes.     

Aristotle

It is the repeated performance of just and temperate actions that produces virtue.     

Aristotle

Every rascal is not a thief, but every thief is a rascal.      

Aristotle

The ideal man takes joy in doing favors for others.     

Aristotle

The ideal man is his own best friend and takes delight in privacy.     

Aristotle

The ideal man bears the accidents of life with dignity and grace, making the best of circumstances.     

Aristotle

The truly good and wise man will bear all kinds of fortune in a seemly way, and will always act in the noblest manner that the circumstances allow.     

Aristotle

Suffering becomes beautiful when anyone bears great calamities with cheerfulness, not through insensibility but through greatness of mind.     

Aristotle

Practical life is not necessarily directed toward other people, as some think; and it is not the case that practical thoughts are only those which result from action for the sake of what ensues. On the contrary, much more practical are those mental activities and reflections which have their goal in themselves and take place for their own sake.     

Aristotle

The physician himself, if sick, actually calls in another physician, knowing that he cannot reason correctly if required to judge his own condition while suffering.     

Aristotle

Temperance is a mean with regard to pleasures.     

Aristotle

Temperance and bravery, then, are ruined by excess and deficiency, but preserved by the mean.     

Aristotle